Welcome to Physicians Plasma Alliance

Opening Hours : Monday to Friday 9am-5pm
  Contact : +1-877-637-5276

Mononucleosis

Are you a patient with Mononucleosis?

Discovering that you have been infected with a disease can be overwhelming.  There usually are many unanswered questions and concerns that recently infected people have.  One that may come to mind is how can I help someone else that may go the same process and struggles that I have?  Participating in Research helps scientist and clinicians find new treatments, tests and quicker diagnostic methods to improve patient outcomes and hopefully prevent the disease from spreading.  You can Help! Become a Specialty Antibody donor with PPA! The information below is not meant for clinical diagnosis, but as an educational resource.

Please review the following donor requirements:

  • You must be clinically diagnosed by a medical professional. Documentation of the diagnosis and/or treatment may be required.
  • You must have a photo ID and be able to provide your social security number or proof of citizenship.
  • You must be at least 18 years old.
  • You must weight at least 110 lbs.
  • You must disclose if you have ever been diagnosed with Hepatitis C and/or HIV.

To begin the Qualification Process, please fill out the Pre-Screening Form. For other questions and concerns about requirements or other information, please check out our FAQ’s. Check out the educational information below!

Mononucleosis/Epstein Barr Virus

Definition

Infectious mononucleosis (mono) is often called the kissing disease. The virus that causes mono is transmitted through saliva, so you can get it through kissing, but you can also be exposed through a cough or sneeze, or by sharing a glass or food utensils with someone who has mono.

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a widespread human herpes virus, can cause mononucleosis — but usually it doesn’t. In fact, most EBV infections aren’t noticeable, even when they’re most active in your body. The virus lives in a person’s salivary glands and may be spread through saliva.

Symptoms

 Fatigue, general malaise sore throat, perhaps a strep-throat that doesn’t get better with antibiotic use, fever, swollen lymph nodes in your neck and armpits, swollen tonsils, headache, skin rash, or soft, swollen spleen.

Treatment

Rest and adequate fluids are key to recovery.

(Mayo Clinic, 2015)

Top